On Demand

Speakers: Ann R. Falsey, MD and Claudia Atherton MT(ASCP)SM----RSV is considered to be a significant threat in pediatric patients as it is a common cause of bronchiolitis (inflammation of the small airways in the lung) and pneumonia in children younger than one year. However, RSV infections are also common throughout adult life, and in adults over the age of 65 its clinical impact is significant. CDC reports that RSV infections result in 177,000 hospitalizations and 14,000 deaths annually in adults older than 65 in the U.S. alone.1Join us for this webinar to learn the following: Adult RSV disease burden and clinical manifestations of RSV in adultsRecognize high risk adult populations and understand need for RSV diagnosisHear practical experience from a user who implemented molecular RSV testing and the impact it has had on patient care and managementReferences1. CDC. Accessed Jun 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/media/mmwrnews/2010/n100304.htm

On Demand
Many bacterial species are developing resistance to multiple antimicrobial agents making therapy for infections difficult. Resistance to carbapenems, often called the drugs of last resort, is spreading globally in multiple species of bacteria. Carbapenem resistance has been identified as an urgent threat by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Several high profile outbreaks across the U.S. have underlined the importance for each facility to have a management plan in place to address this critical threat. This webinar will define carbapenem resistance, review current CDC guidelines for control of carbapenem-resistant organisms, and describe the ways in which rapid molecular diagnostics can support infection prevention activities and facility preparedness. Learning Objectives: After attending this webinar, participants will be able to: Find out how bacteria become resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. Learn why carbapenemase-producing organisms are a particular threat for infection prevention programs. Understand the CDC recommendations for prevention and control of carbapenem-resistant organisms. Discover the critical role that rapid molecular diagnostics play in supporting infection prevention activities.
On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Angella Charnot-Katsikas-----The first FDA-cleared multiplex PCR panel for a large number of respiratory pathogens was first introduced in 2008.1 Laboratories and hospitals have adopted different strategies for offering these assays. Some have implemented strategies to limit the use of the tests and others have offered these assays without limitations. As the adoption of respiratory viral panel grows, there has also been increased attention from payers about the medical necessity and clinical value of these tests. Join us for this webinar to learn the following: Outline some of the available rapid targeted Flu/RSV and full multiplex respiratory viral panels and understand the impact of rapid results in the diagnosis of respiratory infectionsDescribe possible approaches for optimizing the utility of targeted Flu/RSV and full panel tests in the clinical laboratoryLearn reimbursement trends related to panel tests​References:1. Schreckenberger PC, McAdam AJ. Point-Counterpoint: Large Multiplex PCR Panels Should Be

On Demand

Speaker: Daniel A.Green MD------The first FDA-cleared multiplex PCR panel for a large number of respiratory pathogens was first introduced in 2008.1 These tests have the ability to detect 12 to 20 pathogens in a single test and some include pathogens that typically cause different manifestations of infection, although they infect the same organ system.Laboratories and hospitals have adopted different strategies for offering these assays. Some have implemented strategies to limit the use of the tests and other laboratories have offered these assays without limitations. Join us for an educational webinar to learn about one center's experience and outcomes related to respiratory viral panels. Learning Objectives:Provide an overview of upper respiratory tract infections (URI’s) and influenza, including approaches to diagnosis and consequences of antibiotic overuse for viral infectionsPresent results from study evaluating the impact of multiplex respiratory virus testing on antimicrobial p

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Jane Schwebke -------T. vaginalis is the most common non-viral Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) in the United States, with an estimated 5-7 million new cases annually.1 Join us for a webinar to learn the following: 1. T. vaginalis infections - prevalence and medical consequences 2. Review of diagnostic testing methods and the rationale for using NAAT methods 3. New CDC STD testing guidelines and future screening considerations 1 Sexually Transmitted Diseases Treatment Guidelines, 2015. MMWR Recomm Rep 2015:64 (No.3):72.

On Demand

Speaker: Ferric C. Fang, M.D.--------Clostridium difficile is the most common cause of health care-associated infections in U.S. hospitals and the leading cause of gastroenteritis-associated deaths. This encore presentation of a webinar previously aired in March 2016 will review the evolution of laboratory tests used to diagnose Clostridium difficile infections and consider the advantages and disadvantages of current approaches. Controversies regarding potential over-diagnosis and optimal testing strategies will be discussed.

On Demand

Speaker: Patricia Gould,RN-----Reduction of Clostridium difficile rates is a common goal of healthcare institutions of all sizes, with ever-evolving strategies aimed at addressing a challenging task. This webinar – the first in a three-part series – presents one such strategy from the perspective of infection prevention. Utilization of on-demand lab testing, protocol-driven processes, and physician education/engagement will be discussed.

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Stephen Brecher, PhD. -----Since its discovery in the 1930's, C. difficile has been a vexing pathogen to scientists and clinicians alike, and remains a topic of debate and controversy today. This webinar - the second in the three-part series - examines clinical cases that highlight complex patient management situations, discusses common testing and treatment dilemmas, and outlines evidence-based recommendations for C. difficile infection control and prevention.

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Susan Butler-Wu, PhD---As our understanding of C. difficile and C. difficile infection (CDI) continues to evolve, clinical labs find themselves at the center of a shifting debate that carries implications for infection control, hospital reimbursement, public reporting, and most importantly, patient care. This webinar - the final in the three-part series -delves into diagnostic dilemmas, addresses current controversies in testing methodology, and presents testing strategies that account for the strengths and limitations of current technologies.

On Demand

Speakers: Raquel Martinez, PhD (ABMM) and Daniel A. Green, MD---Please join us and learn about improved respiratory testing algorithms in light of the FDA’s recent reclassification of immunoassay based influenza testing.

With a challenging 2016/17 influenza season behind us, questions have emerged about how to best optimize influenza testing in both the centralized laboratory and point of care (POC) settings. With the recent FDA reclassification of Immunoassay based Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Tests (RIDTs), from class I IVD to class II IVD, and the availability of highly sensitive and rapid PCR-based tests, new opportunities for improved respiratory testing algorithms are emerging.

You will learn about the following:
What is the impact of the FDA RIDT re-classification in the clinical setting?
Why the performance of rapid PCR-based technologies can make a clinical difference
See real-world examples of how to implement and optimize rapid PCR-based technologies in a hub-and-spoke mode

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Michael Gelman MD, PhD---Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) represent an urgent threat to global health.1 While the WHO has identified CRE as a critical priority for drug development, the CDC has recommended aggressive action to control CRE spread and prevent CRE infections, particularly within healthcare facilities. Newly developed diagnostics have a role at the core of this effort. This webinar explores the clinical significance and epidemiology of these highly resistant bacteria and reviews how information available from new diagnostics can inform strategies to control spread.


1. CDC CRE Toolkit. November 2015 Update. 

https://www.cdc.gov/hai/organisms/cre/cre-toolkit/index.htm

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Larissa May - In this webinar, Dr. Larissa May will discuss the diagnosis of sexually transmitted infections in the Emergency Department, the need for evidence-based medicine, and how same-visit treatment and management can be facilitated with on-demand testing for CT/NG.

On Demand

Speakers: Dr. Nathan Ledeboer, PhD, D(ABMM) and Dr. David Nicolau, PharmD, FCCP, FIDSA- As lab testing technologies, infection control policies, and reporting metrics have evolved over the years, the diagnosis of C. difficile infections has remained a vexing and often controversial topic.  Recently updated clinical practice guidelines from IDSA/SHEA attempt to shed new light on a familiar debate, but some of the same challenges remain. This webinar presents expert perspectives from two different areas of clinical practice, with commentary on lab testing dilemmas, antimicrobial stewardship, LabID reporting, and the impact of the new guidelines on current practice.

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Debra A. Goff, Pharm.D., FCCP - Antibiotic resistance still remains one of the greatest public health threats today, leading to an estimated 2 million infections and 23,000 deaths per year in the United States.1 

This webinar will discuss the importance of diligent antimicrobial stewardship and accuracy of diagnostic tests for the detection of Group A Streptococcus pharyngitis. It will provide commentary on the high confidence that molecular testing affords the antibiotic steward and how the technology can reduce the practice of prescribing antibiotics "just-in-case" there is an infection, especially as testing moves closer to the patient.2

 

1 https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/65/rr/rr6506a1.htm

2 http://www.tedxcolumbus.com/portfolios/debbie-goff/

On Demand

Speakers: Kimberle Chapin, MD, PhD (ABMM) and James Dunn, PhD, D (ABMM)- Globally, 616 million people are diagnosed with group A Streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis. Of these, 18.1 million cases develop severe GAS disease, and 517,000 people die every year due to GAS disease1. This webinar will explore the evolution of diagnostic testing for the detection of GAS, provide insight into improvements that have been made for rapid testing, and review the consequences of missing positive GAS tests. In addition, clinical case studies will be presented that discuss the consequences of untreated GAS.


1. Carapetis JR, Steer AC, Mulholland EK, Weber M. The global burden of group A streptococcal diseases. Lancet Infect Dis. 2005 Nov; 5 (11):685-94

On Demand

Speaker: Kimberle Chapin, MD, PhD (ABMM)-Acute pharyngitis is a frequent complaint seen in the Emergency Department, and group A Streptococcus is the most common bacterial etiology of pediatric pharyngitis. Globally, 616 million people are diagnosed annually with group A Streptococcus (GAS) pharyngitis. Of these, 18.1 million cases develop severe GAS disease, and 517,000 people die every year due to GAS disease.

Understand why the status quo of testing has led to missing GAS cases and overuse of antibiotics for treatment. Learn how new advances in rapid molecular testing can improve your test results and aid in effective management of your patients.

On Demand

Speaker: Dr. Nicholas Moore, PhD, MLS(ASCP)----The CDC has recommended intensive action to control the spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and prevent CRE infections, particularly within healthcare facilities.Carbapenemase-producing CRE, in particular, are believed to be primarily responsible for the increasing spread of CRE and have been targeted by the CDC for aggressive prevention measures. This webinar explores how to identify patient populations that may benefit from active surveillance testing and compares various testing methods for rapidly identifying carbapenemase-producing CRE.

On Demand

Speaker: Rochelle Odenbrett---Topic: Standardize Your Diagnostics for Economic & Patient Benefits

Diagnostic technologies represent an opportunity and a challenge when it comes to standardizing the quality of patient care throughout health systems. Learn why and how Sanford Health implemented system-wide standardization of molecular respiratory testing in 70 of their hospital and clinic locations. This 30-minute webinar explores the benefits and pitfalls of standardization initiatives.

On Demand

Speaker: Sharon Nachman, MD---Topic: Why Test RSV in Adults?

Standardization of quality patient care throughout your hospital provides multiple opportunities for improvement. During respiratory season, most patients at SUNY Stony Brook are tested for RSV. Gain an understanding for this important practice and hear the physician perspective on the importance of testing for RSV in adults.

On Demand

Globally, 71 million people are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but the burden of HCV continues to increase. Between 2015 and 2030, WHO targets include reducing new HCV infections by 80% and HCV deaths by 65%, and increasing HCV diagnoses from <20% to 90% and number of eligible persons receiving HCV treatment from <10% to 80%. To achieve these targets, targeted interventions are needed to enhance HCV testing, linkage to care, and treatment (“the HCV care cascade”). This presentation reviews available evidence on strategies that have been successfully used to enhance HCV testing, linkage to care.